The Provincial Disaster Assistance Program (PDAP)

The Provincial Disaster Assistance Program (PDAP) is designed to help residents, small businesses, agricultural operations, communal organizations, nonprofit organizations, parks and communities recover from the effects of natural disasters, including flooding, tornadoes, plow winds and other severe weather.

Avoid Delays - Submitting Claims to PDAP and Potential Insurance Coverage

It is important to us that claimants receive eligible financial assistance as quickly as possible. Wherever possible, PDAP tries to avoid potential delays where coordination with private insurance policies might be involved. As part of the claim approval process, PDAP will require a coverage denial letter from your insurance company. However, we do not want this requirement to delay your application and processing of your claim.

Please complete your application form and submit it to PDAP as soon as possible, so that we can begin processing your claim while you continue to work with your insurance company. Once you are able to submit the required documentation, your claim can then be completed much more quickly and eligible payments provided to you.

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1. Before You Apply

What is PDAP?

The Provincial Disaster Assistance Program (PDAP) is designed to help residents, small businesses, agricultural operations, nonprofit organizations and communities recover from the effects of such natural disasters as flooding, tornadoes, plow winds and other severe weather.

Am I eligible?

To be eligible for assistance, your local authority (city, town, village, resort village, provincial park, rural municipality, or First Nation) must apply to be approved. If your community is not listed, contact them directly and inform them of your losses. They will need to apply to PDAP before you can submit your individual claim.

For homeowners to be eligible, the damaged property must be their primary place of residence (seasonal cottages are not covered under PDAP). For a business to qualify for assistance, it must make more than $4000.00 and less than $2 million in gross income, and have less than 20 employees.

What does PDAP cover?

The Provincial Disaster Assistance Program covers damage or loss to uninsurable, essential property. For homeowners, this may include such things as beds, essential furnishings, essential clothing, furnaces, water heaters, fridges, stoves, computers and televisions. For business owners, eligible items may include stock and supplies, essential work clothing, and other necessities. For agricultural claims, this may cover damaged fencing, bales, and field erosion. PDAP may also help cover the cost of clean-up, repairs and temporary relocation.

It is important to remember PDAP is not a substitute for private insurance nor does it provide full compensation for losses. PDAP provides assistance to return property to its pre-disaster value; expenses beyond that value will not be covered by PDAP. It does not provide financial assistance for drought or fire-related losses. It does not cover any loss of production or loss of revenue - including unseeded acres of agricultural land - as these losses are insurable.

What assistance am I eligible to receive?

Homeowners and renters are eligible to receive compensation for damages up to a maximum of $240,000. Small businesses are eligible to receive compensation for damages up to a maximum of $500,000.

Where and when do I apply?

Application forms are available from approved local authorities. Apply as soon as possible. The sooner your application is received, the sooner you will receive assistance. Include all required documentation, this may include a letter of denial from your insurance company (for all claims), a notice of your gross income from your most recent income tax assessment (for small business and agricultural claims), or your mission statement (for nonprofit organization claims). All applications must be received within six months of the disaster.

Where can I get help in applying to PDAP?

Information is available for local authorities and homeowners, tenants, small businesses, agricultural operations, and nonprofit organizations.

What should I do in the meantime?

If the disaster is ongoing, be sure to record any emergency repairs and measures you take to prevent further losses, as you will need to demonstrate your damages and expenses to an adjuster. Take photos and keep samples of emergency building materials used. Any repairs or cleanup that can be safely postponed should be postponed until an adjuster can inspect the site.

PDAP encourages you to begin immediate cleanup of wet material as soon as possible to prevent mould problems. Make a record of all cleanup efforts as you will need to demonstrate your damages to an adjuster. Record equipment usage costs (fans, dehumidifiers, shop vacs, sump pumps). Take detailed photos of all damages, including before and during cleanup. Keep small samples of ruined carpeting. Remember, it's better to have too much documentation than too little. Be sure also to record your work hours and to keep receipts and invoices related to the cleanup effort.
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2. Process for Municipal Claimants & First Nations Bands

Step 1 - As PDAP officials are made aware of areas that are forecast to experience an unnatural event, PDAP will contact the local government authority (i.e. the municipality or First Nation band council) to begin dialogue on how to access the program, what considerations need to be made to designate, and what the requirements are under the program.

Step 2 - PDAP will forward the Request for Designation (ROD) form to the community.

Once contact has been established between PDAP and the local government authority:

  • The ROD form in combination with a true certified copy of a Resolution of Council or Band Council Resolution needs to be submitted to PDAP in order to designate the community as an eligible assistance area. These document need to be forwarded to PDAP within one month of the disaster event
  • It is recommended that the local government authority send both documents to PDAP at the same time. If only one document is received, approval of the designation cannot proceed until PDAP is in receipt of both documents
  • Should a local government authority declare a state of local emergency, this in itself does not make the local government authority eligible for PDAP. The above‐mentioned process must be undertaken to begin the designation process
  • If the local government authority plans to designate for private property damage, PDAP requires an estimate of the number of ratepayers affected
  • PDAP will arrange an initial public information meeting with the local government authority and its ratepayers/residents. The initial meeting includes a presentation on the program and a Q&A session
  • The day after the information meeting, from 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., PDAP will be in the community and will set‐up a triage area where ratepayers can review their specific claims with a PDAP official and get assistance in filling out application forms, etc
  • A PDAP official will review the designation criteria with the local government authority and will provide the calculated deductible amount (Section 1.5, 2013 PDAP General Claim Guidelines)

Step 3 - Designation criteria and deductible amount

  • In accordance with the guidelines, the municipal deductible amount is 0.1% of the most recent SAMA tax assessment
  • There is no deductible for First Nations band council claims
  • Once PDAP is in receipt of the request for designation documents, officials will conduct a review to ensure the local government authority has included:

Step 4 - PDAP receives RM/local authority’s request for designation

  • Estimated amount of damage (estimates over $250,000 require specific description of damages, e.g., three culverts washed out, two bridges washed out, etc., in order to substantiate payments back to the local government authority and for cost recovery purposes)
  • Dates of the disaster
  • Estimate of the number of ratepayers/residents affected (only required if the local government authority plans to designate for private property damage)
  • Confirmation of the event with Saskatchewan Watershed Authority (SWA) (PDAP performs this step)
  • PDAP then processes the request and generates a Designation Authorization for sign off by the Executive Director of Protection and Emergency Services. Authorization is basically approval to designate the community eligible for provincial disaster assistance and details the following:
    • Name of the community
    • Event date range
    • Damage description
    • Total cost of damages as a result of the event
  • “Authorization” type varies dependent on what the local government authority will designate for ‐‐ municipal claim, private claim or both (Section 2, 2013 PDAP General Claim Guidelines)
  • Once the “Authorization” is signed off, PDAP sends a formal notification package to the local government authority, that includes:
  • An outline of next steps
    Important dates to remember, for example:
    • Date of designation authorization
      - Municipal claim application deadline (must be returned to PDAP within six months of the authorization date)
      - Restoration deadline (must be completed within 12 months of the authorization date)
    • Pre‐populated application forms for ratepayers/residents for private property damage (if applicable) NOTE: Distribution and notification to ratepayers/residents is the responsibility of the local government authority. However, the Communications Branch of the Ministry of Government Relations will place an ad in the local newspaper advising ratepayers/residents on how to access PDAP assistance via their local government authority. Another option communities have considered is the distribution of flyers to ratepayers/residents.
  • PDAP Application Guide
  • PDAP Claimant Written Statement form
  • PDAP Clean‐up Supplement form
  • Triage Assessment form
  • Project Site Details form
  • Gravel Average form
  • Once designated, PDAP assigns an engineer. The engineer then contacts the local government authority (generally within two to three weeks) to perform the assessment.

Step 5 - The local government authority is designated

  • When the assessment is complete, the engineering firm provides the assessment report to PDAP and the local government authority
  • Pay‐out of costs as submitted by the local government authority cannot occur until the engineer provides the assessment report to PDAP. The assessment report is the substantiating document that allows PDAP to begin pay‐out
  • Costs incurred as a result of mitigating a natural disaster and that are eligible for reimbursement before an engineer’s assessment report is received at PDAP include:

Step 6 - Mitigation / Clean-up / “Response Costs” (Section 3, 2013 PDAP General Claim Guidelines)

  • Water removal (pumping, wet‐vac truck rental, hauling water)
  • Sandbagging
  • Gravel

The initial payment on submission of costs needs to exceed the deductible amount (if applicable). Subsequent payments can be reimbursed as cash flow is needed.

Notes:

Repairs must be completed and paid invoices must be submitted for verification with the engineer’s report. However, PDAP can provide progress payments in order to assist with cash flow.

Project Site Details form:

  • Include invoices/receipts that clearly document the break‐down of work. Example: If gravel has been dumped, include land location and number of yards of gravel
  • Choose two to three large invoices and provide verification of payment of the receipts (i.e., cancelled cheque) – this helps speed up reimbursements

Gravel Average form:

  • Used as a guide to ensure that communities are being reimbursed for eligible gravel usage/costs

Submitting Supporting Documentation

In addition to using the postal service, applicants may send supporting forms and documentation on their claims to PDAP electronically. Information can be faxed to 1-306-798-2318 or emailed to pdapdocs@gov.sk.ca.

All correspondence must include:

  • Claimant name
  • Address
  • Claim number
  • Contact information

Claimants are reminded that they must send the original version of their application forms when applying to PDAP. Only supporting documents may be sent by email or fax.


Sample job posting-Disaster Coordinator - Municipalities

Job Description

The Provincial Disaster Assistance Program (PDAP) can fund one position as PDAP Coordinator in the municipalities provided the municipality has been designated as an eligible assistance area under PDAP.  The position is eligible for funding through PDAP as long as the employee is not a regular employee of the municipality, but is a contracted position.  The incumbent in the position focuses on emergency management by providing information, assistance and services for the municipality.  Along with having the responsibility for educating and supplying information to residents regarding individual private claims, adjuster reports and PDAP Regulations and guidelines.  They are responsible for documenting all damages, supplying appropriate backup information and is the main contact for PDAP staff.   They are also responsible for recruiting volunteers and collecting resource information, which includes taking pictures when the disaster occurs or immediately following the disaster and is responsible for directing supplies and personnel to appropriate locations, if necessary. 

Essential Duties and Responsibilities

  • The community has to be designated as an eligible assistance area under PDAP.
  • Serve as facilitator to get information out to the community members about PDAP Regulations and guidelines.
  • Reports to Council and Administrator regarding the PDAP claim.
  • Document all damaged sites within the municipality and takes pictures immediately following the disaster.  Keeps accurate records, reports and receipts.
  • Has all required documentation on hand, i.e.: private property applications and ensures all documentation is signed.
  • Works with the PDAP assigned engineer/adjuster to ensure all damaged sites are inspected and reported.
  • Works in close relationship with PDAP to plan, coordinate and work with individuals, families and the community, if displacement occurs.
  • Provides information and documentation to PDAP as required and in a timely fashion.
  • Coordinates all suppliers and contractors and meets to negotiate fair pricing for all repairs.
  • Is responsible for ensuring payment of contractors, suppliers and upon payment, the submission of receipts to PDAP.

General Wage

  • The typical wage for a Program Coordinator would be between $16 – 20 per hour.

Sample job posting-First Nations Disaster Event Coordinator

Job Description

The Provincial Disaster Assistance Program funds one position as Coordinator in the First Nation community.  The position is eligible for funding through PDAP as long as the employee is not a regular employee of the First Nation, but is a contracted position.  The incumbent in the position focuses on emergency management by providing information, assistance, and services to the First Nation community.  Along with having the responsibility for educating and supplying information to band membership about individual private claims, adjuster reports and PDAP Regulations and guidelines.  They are responsible for documenting all damaged houses, according to house number, and are responsible for making sure the tenant is available for the adjusters scheduled inspection.  They are also responsible for recruiting volunteers and collecting resource information, which includes taking pictures when the disaster occurs or immediately following the disaster and is responsible for directing supplies and personnel to appropriate locations if necessary. The person in the position provides assistance and support to disaster recovery activities including planning, coordination and development of volunteers.  Supervisory responsibilities include planning, assigning, and directing volunteer work; addressing volunteer concerns and problem resolution.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities

  • Serves as facilitator to get information out to community members about the Provincial Disaster Assistance Program Regulations and guidelines.
  • Informs leadership about timelines on the event.
  • Document all damaged housing units on the First Nation and takes pictures immediately following the disaster.  Keeps accurate records, reports and receipts.
  • Has all required documentation on hand i.e. private property applications, and makes sure all documentation is signed.
  • Works with the PDAP assigned Adjuster to make sure all damaged units are inspected and reported.
  • Attends each damaged housing unit with the Adjuster and makes sure that the tenants are available.  If a tenant cannot make the appointment, make sure that the Adjuster is contacted as soon as possible to re-schedule. 
  • Recruits volunteers and collects resource information.
  • Serves as a facilitator and supervisor of volunteers.  Keeps current records on volunteers.
  • Works in close relationship with PDAP to plan, coordinate and work with individuals, families and the community if displacement occurs.
  • Provides information and documentation to PDAP as required and in a timely fashion.
  • Must be prepared to meet with suppliers and contractors to negotiate pricing for house repairs.
  • Maintains relationships and communications with facilities that can serve as potential service delivery sites (i.e. shelter, etc)
  • Facilitates information sharing with community groups regarding Red Cross and PDAP disaster guidelines, preparedness and other activities.
  • Tracks emergency supplies, resources, volunteers and available shelter space.

General Wage

  • The typical wage for a Program Coordinator would be between $16 – 20 per hour.

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3. Process for Private Claimants & First Nations Residents

Forms are available to pick up from your local authority (city, town, village, resort village, provincial park, rural municipality, or First Nation) once it has been designated by PDAP. For more details, read "Before You Apply."

Once you have your application form, you can refer to these documents for help completing it:

  • Step by Step Instructions for a Private Application
  • Sample PDAP Application Form
  • 2014 PDAP General Claim Guidelines
Categories

Private claim applicants fall into one of five categories. Some people may need to submit separate applications for more than one category.

  1. Home Owner: When the damaged property is your primary residence, and you are the owner of the property
  2. Tenant: When the damaged property is your primary residence, and you are renting the property (this category includes First Nations residents) 
  3. Agriculture: When the damaged property is your farm operation
  4. Small Business: When the damaged property is your small business (including rental property). Small businesses must have gross income between $4,000 and $2 million, and employ less than 20 people to be eligible.
  5. Non-Profit: When the damaged property is a corporation, organization, foundation, society or association which is a registered charity according to the The Income Tax Act (Canada), is incorporated or continued pursuant to an Act or an Act of Parliament of Canada for the purpose of providing social, charitable or recreational services.
  6. Park Authority: When the damaged property is a regional park authority as defined in The Regional Parks Authority (1979) the Wascana Centre Authority, the Meewasin Valley Authority, the Wakamow Valley Authority or a provincial park pursuant to The Parks Act.
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4. After You Apply

I've already sent in my application. Now what?

Once PDAP receives your application, an adjuster will be assigned to your file. The adjuster will arrange a time with you to complete a damage assessment of your property. If you have private insurance, your insurer must issue a letter to PDAP explaining which of your damages are and are not covered by your policy.

How does the reimbursement process work?

After the adjuster’s report is submitted to PDAP, you will receive a letter with a Payment Worksheet describing eligible costs. In most cases, a single payment (also called a FastTrack Payment) based on this Payment Worksheet will be issued to you shortly thereafter.

Reimbursements for eligible structural repairs follow a different process; see Section 2.4.3 of the 2014 PDAP General Claim Guidelines for more details.

I’m doing my own repair and restoration work and/or cleanup. How much can I claim for my labour?

PDAP pays 140% of the provincial minimum wage (as determined at April 1st of the year of the disaster) to claimants performing their own repair and restoration work. See Section 3.6.2 of the PDAP General Claim Guidelines for more details. PDAP pays 100% of the provincial minimum wage (as determined at April 1st of the year of the disaster) to claimants performing their own clean-up work. Please note the clean-up maximums outlined in Section 3.6.3 of the 2014 PDAP General Claim Guidelines.

I'm hiring a contractor to help with the repair work. What can I claim?

PDAP will reimburse you for eligible costs that the contractor charges, minus the taxes. PDAP does not reimburse PST or GST on any claim. PDAP requires estimates from contractors in advance, and pays only rates within standard Saskatchewan standards.